What Happens to Facebook & Twitter Accounts When Someone Dies?

What Happens When Someone Dies?

What Happens When Someone Dies?

It is a fact that we’re all going to die, and if you’re on social media sites like Facebook and/or Twitter, you may be curious as to what will happen to your account when you’re gone.  You can express how you would like your account handled by preparing letters of
instruction.

Each social network has their own process and options to handle the profiles and accounts of the deceased.   We are going to cover Facebook and Twitter in this post so continue below to learn more about each site’s policy.

What Happens to Your Facebook When You Die?

What Happens to Your Facebook Profile When You Die?

Facebook

The process for a deceased person’s Facebook account has several different options and is different then many other social media services.  First, Facebook utilizes an online form that allows anyone to notify Facebook about a deceased user by submitting a valid request electronically.  Facebook will then memorialize the account, which means that nobody will be able to log into the account and only confirmed friends at the time of memorializing will be able to see the profile of the deceased.

Unlike Twitter, Facebook allows the confirmed friends to post information and photos on the wall of the deceased, and many people use this as a way to share their thoughts and feelings as well as celebrating the life of the deceased.

In the alternative, Facebook also allows an immediate family member to request that the deceased’s account be completely removed from the site.  In order to do this, Facebook requires that you verify your identity and relationship to the deceased by providing the deceased’s birth and death certificate and proof that you’re a lawful representative of the deceased.

GET A FACEBOOK LETTER OF INSTRUCTION

Do you have a Twitter Letter of Instruction?

Do you have a Twitter Letter of Instruction?

Twitter

When someone dies, it is the responsibility of a family member or person in charge of the deceased’s estate to reach out to Twitter administration and let them know. Along with the information, Twitter will need this individual to provide them with the username of the deceased, a copy of the individual’s ID, a copy of the deceased’s death certificate, and a letter that contains information about the person making the request.  Twitter does  not have an online form and requires requests to be submitted via fax or mail.

This person has the ability to decide whether they want the deceased’s account completely deleted from the site or if they want a backup created of the deceased’s public tweets.

Once Twitter has been notified, the deceased’s account will no longer be found in the Who to Follow section and messages will not be accepted on the page. If a person wants to leave a tweet for a deceased individual, they will have to have login information for the deceased’s account.

GET A TWITTER LETTER OF INSTRUCTION

In the United States approximately 80% of population has not taken the time to prepare any written plans and instructions in the event of death.  It is not a pleasant topic for most people, and pondering what will happen to your social media accounts when you pass is not something that many people think about on a typical day.   By preparing simple letters of instruction for your Facebook and Twitter accounts you ease the burden on those you care about after you die, because they will need this information and will have it neatly compiled and documented.  It’s also a good idea to share the existence of these instructions and how to locate them when necessary with friends and family members so that everyone knows about your wishes.

If someone you love has passed away and they have a Facebook and/or Twitter account, make sure that you let the social networks know as soon as possible so that the proper steps can be taken and their wishes carried out.

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